NEWSLETTER FOR WILDLIFE REHABILITATORS OF NORTH CAROLINA

Volume 19                                                                                                                     March 2005

   

 

A quarterly newsletter produced by the Wildlife Rehabilitators of North Carolina (WRNC). WRNC's mission is to share information and knowledge about wildlife rehabilitation for the benefit of native wildlife. For comments or questions, write to: WRNC, 2542 Weymoth Rd, Winston-Salem , NC 27103

Continuing Education

·Our third WRNC Symposium took place on Feb. 25-27 in the Education Building at the NC Zoo. See symposium related articles for details and mark your calendar for Jan. 27-29, 2006.

·Like to travel? IWRC upcoming classes and locations:

Disclaimer The opinions, techniques, and recommendations expressed in the articles of this newsletter are those of the author(s) and do not imply endorsement by WRNC.

Date Course Location
Apr 16, 2005 - Apr 17, 2005 1AB: Basic Wildlife Rehabilitation Everett, WA

For updated calendar, course information and registration go to: http://www.iwrc-online.org/training/training.cfm

· The WRNC website maintains a training information page with contact details. Check it out at: http://www.ncwildliferehab.org/wrnctrain.htm

· Want a refresher course in your town, read how to organize in the Refresher Course Report below.

Directory Updates
Have you moved? Has your email address changed? Is your phone number listed incorrectly in the directory?
Send updates to Carla Johnson at Wildlifeed2@aol.com

Newsletter Goes ELECTRONIC
This will be the first issue of our newsletter available online. To save trees we would like to move as many folks as possible to an electronic subscription. This will also free club money up for other membership activities too. To start your electronic subscription go to http://www.ncwildliferehab.org/newsletter/notify_by_email.html.



Symposium Round-up

By Jean Chamberlain      

 

Our 3rd conference was held Feb. 25-27 after being postponed due to bad weather on the original date.  On Friday night we started with the Ice Breaker, which featured a wildlife trivia contest similar to “Jeopardy!”.  We divided into four teams.  Two teams competed, then the other two, and finally the two winners met to decide the contest winner.  Many of the questions were not easy.  Try a few of them yourself in the Trivia Contest Question section following this article.

 

On Saturday morning after some brief introductory remarks, we got underway with the sessions.  At the same time, there was a lot of activity in the hallways outside of the sessions, particularly during the breaks.  There were more exhibitors this year with a wider variety of items to purchase.  One very busy place was the tables where WRNC sold books and supplies.    Prior to the symposium, when we ordered the books, we didn’t know what kind of response there would be for the display and sale.   We were pleased that all copies were sold and we could have sold more of many of the titles. We definitely plan to do this again next year, offering a larger number of copies. 

 

We had syringes for sale and replacement nuts and bolts for pet carriers, a popular item. We sold out of the nuts and bolts. We’ll have them again next year. We took orders for silicone nipples. Did you order yours?  Beth Knapp-Tyner still has some for sale.  If you need them, email her at WildatHeartRehab@aol.com.  Let us know if you have any ideas for other items that we can sell that would be popular.  We are always looking for items that we can buy in bulk and sell at a significantly lower price than members can purchase them for individually. 

 

We also extend our thanks to all who contributed items for the raffle, for the details see Raffle Thank You.

 

Again this year there were several tours of the Valerie Schindler Wildlife Rehabilitation Center and also the zoo veterinary center.  The latter provided a special treat, as visitors were surprised to find two tiger cubs in residence.

 

The sessions were superb.  We learned about antibiotics from Dr. Michael Loomis.  He pointed out that a common mistake for beginning rehabilitators is to stop giving antibiotics when the symptoms disappear rather than completing the entire course of treatment.  This can result in incomplete clearance of the infection and increased microbial resistance to the antibiotic.  I was fascinated by Dr. Ed Smallwood’s straightforward explanation of the efficiency of the bird lungs. In the mammal anatomy session we learned that opossums have epipubic bones that support their marsupial pouch and deer have a four-chambered stomach. In the afternoon, Dr. Ralph Houser put together a simple CO2 ‘chamber’ for us and then demonstrated how to use it.  He had us come up and feel the gas sinking around the tub. Dana Simms took us through the history of the fawn rehab program and showed photographs of different cases of fawns she has rehabilitated.

 

Early Sunday morning I presented some ideas on enriching our critter’s lives.  This was a new and intriguing idea for many in the audience.  In Vet Speak, who was that crawling on the table imitating a wild critter?  And tell me, where is the anterior of an animal that stands on all fours?  Did you know that herons have an interesting similarity to vultures?  They both disgorge their stomach contents when disturbed. We concluded with two animals with crazy nicknames: fairy diddles (southern flying squirrels) and whistlepigs (groundhogs) with an appearance by Murphy, the zoo rehab center’s education groundhog.       (Continued)

 

From the editor's desk
This newsletter is your tool for reaching everyone else in WRNC. Please feel free to submit comments, corrections, announcements and submissions for future newsletters to Sally Davis at wekaterrapin@hotmail.com or by phone at
(919) 462-3249. The next editorial deadline is Mon., May 7th.


Symposium Round Up (continued)

 

And I must not forget to mention the workshops.  We had more than 40 people administering sub-q fluids to cadavers.  The fecal workshop was a favorite of mine.  Dr. James Flowers demonstrated three techniques to prepare the specimens and helped us identify parasite eggs. 

 

The evaluations told us that this symposium was a real success.  On a scale of one to five more than 50% rated it a five.  There were only two evaluations with a rating below four.   We thank all the presenters who gave their personal time to share their knowledge and experience with us to make this an enjoyable weekend.   We all learned a lot and had a great time.     

 

 Be sure to set aside Jan 27th – 29th next year for our fourth symposium.  You won’t want to miss it.  


 

Trivia Contest Questions

Did you miss the Ice Breaker? Then, see how well you can do on these questions from the wildlife trivia contest.

1. What is the only bird that can fly backwards?
2. What rodent's mouth closes behind its incisors allowing it to chew its food underwater?
3. What animal blinks its eyes when it swallows food?
4. What is a skunk's only serious predator?
5. What is the soft furry covering containing capillaries on a deer's growing antlers called?
6. In the movie Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, what does the Enterprise transport back to its time?
7. What is a whistlepig?
8. What bird is the state bird for the most states?
9. Which reptile does not have teeth?
10. What bird dives to catch its prey at more than 200 miles per hour?

ANSWERS at end of newsletter.

 

Cage Grant Recipients
By Toni O’Neil

We had four applicants this year for the first Cage Building Grant to be offered to WRNC members. The Board's initial plan was to award one $500 grant. Instead, it decided to offer two grants of $250. The entire board reviewd the applications in a meeting following the symposium in February. Three of the four applicants met all the requirements to be eligible for the grants. The Board agreed to increase the grant fund to $750, awarding all three eligible applicants a grant. The recipients who will receive $250 each are: Carolina Waterfowl Rescue, Carolina Wild Care, and Wild for Life. Congratulations! The results of the projects will be featured in a future newsletter.


Thank you from Jeannie Mintz
A big thank you goes out to everyone who helped New Hanover County wildlife rehabilitators after Hurricane Charlie.

The gorgeous opossum cage

Any one interested in the 24 x 24 wire cage that was given away at the WRNC Symposium raffle?
Contact Bob Kiger at 910-867-7559.
The pickup price per cage will be $50.00

Raffle Thank You

By Toni O'Neil

 

Comments from exhibitors at the symposium again this year have been very heartening.  We are so glad they chose to share some of their literature, displays, and fine gifts.  Sales were good, even though we had to assign everyone one table only this year, and space was limited.  I have heard from several people that they plan to set up displays next year. Rehabbers who make wildlife art also will be offering their products for sale after seeing how well it went this year.  So plan to increase your spending allowance for next year's symposium!

 

The raffle was a tremendous success, raising $585 for WRNC.  This money is channeled back into benefits for members in the form of scholarships, medical supplies, books, and other resource materials available for sale at cost for you, with the added bonus of saving on shipping costs.  It was also apparent everyone had a lot of fun.

 

We would like to thank the following folks for making our raffle a success with their generous donations:

 

John Althouse                                                                         Blue Ridge Wildlife Institute

The Carolina Raptor Center (CRC)                                        Coconut Creek Publishing Company

Friends of the WNC Nature Center                                        Fox Valley

Pam Graham                                                                          Hancock Fabrics of Fayetteville, NC

I.W.R.C.                                                                                   Bob and Carrie Kiger

Kathy Lillard                                                                           Nature's Way

N.W.R.A.                                                                                 Toni O'Neil

Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter (OWLS)                                     Wal-Mart of Fayetteville, NC

Wild for Life

 

Refresher Course Report for 2004

By Jean Chamberlain

 

WRNC held two refresher course sessions at the symposium in 2004. We also taught refresher courses in Asheville, Charlotte, Greenville, Raleigh, Wilmington, Winston-Salem, and at Hatteras and Kill Devil Hills on the Outer Banks.  More than 180 rehabilitators took the course.
     

PowerPoint presentations, skits and a video were used in a course intended as a review for rehabilitators who had some experience. People attended who had no experience, as well as advanced rehabilitators. Nearly everyone said they felt the course material was at about the right level for an effective review. 
     

Any rehabilitator in the state was welcome; membership in WRNC was not required.  The course did, however, bring several new members to our organization.  We signed up fifty members at the eight locations where the courses were offered.
     

When asked to evaluate the effectiveness of the course, the responses of the participants were split between good and excellent.  The median rating on a scale of one to 10, with 10 being the best, was 9.  The course was well prepared, well taught, and the presentations were professional.  WRNC can be proud of this accomplishment.
     

In 2005 we will teach the class at any location that has 12 or more people interested.  Contact Jean Chamberlain (jchamberlain1@alltel.net) or Carla Johnson (wildlifeed2@aol.com) if you are interested in having us visit you.   We will also provide the PowerPoint presentations to anyone in the state who wishes to incorporate them into wildlife rehabilitation classes.  Our goal is to reach as many rehabilitators as possible with this material.


Board Changes

By Sally Davis

 

Each year at symposium the WRNC membership selects new board members for three-year terms.  Also the board elects officers at the board meeting immediately following symposium.  Officer positions are one year long with the option to continue for a second year in the same office.  This year all officer positions were up for election.

 

WRNC sends a big thank you to our outgoing board members:  Gayle Houston, Lee Bolt and Sherri Koester.  Mathias Englemann returns to the board for another three-year term.  We also welcome three new board members:  Elizabeth Hanrahan, Mary Beth Bryman and Beth Knapp-Tyner.  Bios for all three of our new board members follow this article.

 

A big thanks also goes out to our outgoing president, vice president, secretary, and treasurer, Jean Chamberlain, Carla Johnson, Joan McMurray and Sherri Koester respectively.  Jean, Carla, and Joan remain active members of our board.  Linda Bergman and Toni O’Neil step into the roles of president and vice president respectively.  We look forward to great things from this Down East tag-team.  Sally Davis is the new secretary and Beth will be our treasurer.  Also Carla, Jean, and Sally continue in their current roles of membership, webmaster, and newsletter editor respectively.

 

Bios of New Board Members

 

M. Beth Knapp-Tyner, Treasurer

Beth is an independent home-based rehabilitator and resides in a very rural area of Polk County in the Western half of North Carolina. She has been a state and federally permitted rehabilitator since 2001. 2005 is her third year of rehabilitating deer/fawns. Animals, be they domestic or wild, have been a big part of her life for as long as she can remember. She is a certified equine sports massage therapist and was a certified childbirth instructor and doula for several years.  She is a member of IWRC and NWRA, in addition to WRNC and believes strongly in networking with other rehabilitators. As a new board member, she would like to help WRNC with its current programs and plans and also help to possibly implement programs that would increase benefits to its members, e.g. through networking, discount purchasing.  Her experience comes from serving as a volunteer for a few different non-profit organizations in the past, being a business owner, and obtaining an AS degree a little later in life than is the norm.

 

Elizabeth Hanrahan

Elizabeth Hanrahan began working in wildlife rehabilitation in 1985 while serving as the executive director of the Hall County, GA, Humane Society.  She received her initial training from veterinarians and has taken classes through the Wildlife Center of Virginia, Carolina Raptor Center, NWRA, IWRC, & WRNC.   In addition, she frequently presents papers, workshops, and classes and has published papers for NWRA, IWRC, WRNC and College of the Albemarle.  Wildlife rehabilitation activities are supported by private birding and eco tours of Ocracoke led by Elizabeth.  Volunteer activities include:  Sea Turtle monitoring, rescue, and transport, first responder for the  Mammal Stranding Network,  International Shorebird  monitor for the National Park Service and Manomet Center and tour leader of NPS summer birding programs and leader for the Wings Over Water Birding Festival.   Her community activities include volunteer docent for the Ocracoke Preservation Society and board member of the Ocracoke Child Care Center.  She has a B.S. in business administration, a M.Ed. in marketing education and an Ed.S. in Vocational Education Administration.  Elizabeth and her husband, Dr. Calvin Hanrahan, a physical therapist, have two grown sons and live on Ocracoke.

Mary Beth Bryman

Mary Beth Bryman is co-founder and co-director of Wild for Life: Center for Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc. in Asheville, NC.  Wild for Life holds both state and federal permits.  Mary Beth holds a B.S. in medical technology and a B.A. in biology.  She has been rehabilitating for more than 12 years and attends NWRA, IWRC, WRNC conferences and workshops.  She is active in wildlife rehabilitation, environmental education internships with the University of North Carolina-Asheville, as well as wildlife educational programs for the public.  Her emphasis is generating public awareness about wildlife rehabilitation and conservation.  Her goals as a board member are to improve the networking for rehabilitators in North Carolina and to stress the importance to new and upcoming rehabilitators of the importance to keep rehab animals wild and not allowing them to become imprinted or humanized.

Board member contact list (email)

Bergman, Linda (President) lbergman@ec.rr.com
Bryman, Mary Beth wildforlife@juno.com
Burgin, Jennifer skwurllady@bellsouth.net
Chamberlain, Jean jchamberlain1@alltel.net
Davis, Sally (Newsletter Editor, Secretary) wekaterrapin@hotmail.com
Engelmann, Mathias mathiasengelmann@birdsofprey.org
Hanrahan, Elizabeth birdworld@ocracokenc.net
Johnson, Carla (Membership) Wildlifeed2@aol.com
Knapp-Tyner, Beth (Treasurer) WildatHeartRehab@aol.com
McMurray, Joan mcmurray@nczoo.com
O'Neil, Toni (Vice President) oneil9734@yahoo.com
Schopler, Bobby bobbyschopler@hotmail.com
Weiss, Mary weiss275@cs.com

New Membership Directory

The new state directory will be published in
April 2005.

Be sure to renew your membership so that you are included in the directory.

Dues can be mailed to WRNC, 2542 Weymoth Rd., Winston-Salem, NC 27103.
Make $15 membership checks out to WRNC.

Hardcopies will be available for $5.
 


 

Ask WRNC

Q: How do I remove bird poop from my carriers? It gets like concrete.
A: Hot water will remove much of it. Try Windex on the really hard spots. It will help soften it.

If you have any questions you would like WRNC to answer in future newsletters, submit them to Jean Chamberlain at jchamberlain1@alltel.net.

 

Want to Walk on the Wild Side?

Register now for Piedmont Wildlife Center's Walk for Wildlife on Sunday, April 10th at Lake Crabtree County Park. Come enjoy an afternoon outside discovering what North Carolina wildlife is all about, while helping raise money for local wildlife. For information and registration call 968-8557 or visit www.piedmontwildlifecenter.org.

 

10% Discount at the Squirrel Store

WRNC members can receive either a 10% discount or Free shipping on their first order from Squirrel Store, which now carries rehab supplies (formulas, feeds, etc.) at competitive prices, in addition to other wildlife related items. Orders can be placed via their website (www.SquirrelStore.com) or by calling Misty at 1-866-907-7757. Make sure to mention you are a WRNC member for this special offer.

- Beth Knapp-Tyner

 

 

Other Board Member Bios

 

Linda Bergman, President
Linda holds a M.S. in educational psychology and teaches curriculum courses at Coastal Carolina Community College in Jacksonville.  She also designs and develops soft skill/hard skill industry training for new and existing businesses in eastern North Carolina as a Training and Employee Development Specialist (TEDS).  Shortly after retiring from the Marine Corps in 1992, Linda began volunteering at the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Morehead City, pursuing her passion for wildlife conservation and rehabilitation. She achieved her certification as a wildlife rehabilitator for the state of North Carolina and is a member of NWRA, board member of WRNC and continues to be an active volunteer at OWLS, working in rehab, mentoring and facilitating tour groups.  Linda is proactively concerned with the loss of wildlife habitat due to progressive development in Onslow and it's surrounding counties and regularly attends community meetings to voice those concerns through education, as well as, rally support.

 

Toni O’Neil, Vice President                                                                                      

Toni holds a B.S. in zoology with a minor in wildlife management from the University of Maryland. She has been a rehabilitator for 14 years and holds state and federal permits. Toni has held administrative positions with ARC and has taught classes for CRC, ARC, and Carolina Wild Care. She has given presentations to school and civic groups. She believes in a strong statewide networking system to assist rehabilitators at all levels, and to encourage them to participate and become involved in reaching out to others. She believes that communication between rehabilitators is vital to further education, keep current, share ideas, and be better able to serve the animals and the public. She now resides near the coast and looks forward to representing the Eastern part of the state. She is the director of Possumwood Acres Wildlife Sanctuary in Hubert, NC.

 

Sally Davis, Secretary

Sally received her BA in computer science and graduate certificate in education, middle school sciences, from Dartmouth College.  After ten years of international computer consulting and teaching, including executive level management experience, she now pursues her dream career as a DVM student at NCSU, College of Veterinary Medicine.  Rehabilitation experience include pinniped and cetacean rehab at Mystic Aquarium in Connecticut, volunteer work at the Valerie Schindler Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, and turtle team at the CVM.  She has also pursued interests in nutrition and zoo medicine at the Brookfield Zoo in Chicago, Mystic Aquarium and the NCSU Center for Marine Science and Technology in Morehead City. She currently edits the WRNC newsletter.

 

Jean Chamberlain, Past President

Jean taught high school mathematics for several years and then pursued a career in Information Technology.  She is now retired.   She and her husband have been rehabilitators for 12 years, rehabilitating raptors for about 10 years. She is particularly interested in animal behavior & training. She helped design and teaches WRNC's Refresher Course and also organizes the WRNC symposium each year. Jean is webmaster for WRNC and is also the webmaster for IWRC.

 

Carla Johnson, Past Vice President

Carla has been rehabbing for more than 10 years, is vice president of WRNC and president of Wildlife Rehab, Inc., her local rehab group.  She coordinates wildlife rehabilitation classes through the local community college in Winston-Salem, NC and presents countless environmental education programs to the surrounding community for Wildlife Rehab, Inc. each year.  Carla is responsible for maintaining WRNC’s membership records and for producing the membership directory.  She is also on the symposium committee and helped put together and teach the refresher course for WRNC.

 

Joan McMurray, Past Secretary

Joan is a retired Air Force nurse.  She has been actively involved in wildlife rehabilitation for more than 20 years and holds both state and federal permits. She began by volunteering at a center in Maryland for five years, moved to North Carolina where she rehabbed out of her home for 14 years and has been the Rehabilitation Coordinator at the zoo’s Valerie Schindler Wildlife Rehabilitation Center since it opened in 2001. As such, she is involved in the day-to-day care of the animals, supervising the other volunteers, planning and conducting educational activities for the public and the volunteers.  Joan feels that a strong state organization can help improve the quality of rehabilitation throughout the state by offering educational opportunities and networking among rehabilitators.

 

Jennifer Burgin

Jennifer has been a rehabilitator in Henderson County (district 9) for 13 years.  She has dealt with a wide variety of animals but is now concentrated on critical care of squirrels. Currently she is in school full time pursuing her RN degree and her rehab activities will be limited to triage and stabilization of squirrels until they can be transferred to other rehabbers. In the past she took in approximately 200 animals a year and taught rehab classes in her area.  She seeks to improve networking among rehabilitators in the state.  She feels that a mentoring system for new rehabilitators could be an important adjunct or alternative to formal training. 

 

Mathias Engelmann

Mathias Engelmann is director of Rehabilitation at Carolina Raptor Center. Born in Munich, Germany, he “migrated” to the U.S.A. in 1980. He holds a degree in biology from UNC-Charlotte and has been working at CRC since 1983, first as a volunteer and for the past 11 years as a paid staff member. Mathias has been involved with the WRNC since its inception. His interests include cage construction and research.

 

Bobby Schopler, DVM, PhD
Dr. Bobby Schopler received his veterinary degree from North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine in 1986 and Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina School of Public Health in 1998. He is the founder/executive director of the Piedmont Wildlife Center. He is a founding Board member of WRNC, beginning in June, 2000.

 

Mary Weiss

Mary was a licensed nurse in New York, raised eight children and took care of many different animals, farm and domestic, while the children were growing up.  She raised and showed Saint Bernards for 35 years and for the last five years has rehabilitated approximately 150 small mammals per year.  Mary is a member of the NWRA and IWRC.  She has attended many WRNC meetings and provided refreshments and snacks.

   

How to go ELECTRONIC

Here is your chance to do your little bit for the environment and also save money for things of more use to the membership than printing and sending paper in the mail.
Send an email to WRNCnews@aol.com from the email at which you would like to receive your newsletter. Include your name in the body of the email so we can track your preference.

End of Year Reports

Please get your end of year reports in to WRNC. File existing federal records or use the form below.
WRNC will be presenting statistics and other findings based on submitted reports at the next symposium.

 


WILDLIFE REHABILITATORS OF NORTH CAROLINA END OF YEAR REPORT FOR 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REHABILITATORS NAME OR INSTITUTION NAME:

 

 

 

 

 

 

ADDRESS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CITY

 

 

COUNTY

 

 

REGION

 

           

    Return to:  WRNC, 2542 Weymoth Rd., Winston-Salem, NC 27103 or email cmjohnso@wfubmc.edu  (PLEASE PHOTOCOPY AS NEEDED)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

 

SPECIES/COMMON NAME

DATE

WHERE FOUND

REASON

DISPOSITION*

DATE

 

 

IN

TOWN

COUNTY

FOR REHAB

 

OUT

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  * R = released; D = died; DOA = Dead on arrival; E = euthanized on arrival; T = transferred; I = institutionalized (educational use)


 

WILDLIFE REHABILITATORS OF NORTH CAROLINA END OF YEAR REPORT FOR 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REHABILITATORS NAME OR INSTITUTION NAME:

 

 

 

 

 

 

ADDRESS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CITY

 

 

COUNTY

 

 

REGION

 

           

    Return to:  WRNC, 2542 Weymoth Rd., Winston-Salem, NC 27103 or email cmjohnso@wfubmc.edu  (PLEASE PHOTOCOPY AS NEEDED)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

 

SPECIES/COMMON NAME

DATE

WHERE FOUND

REASON

DISPOSITION*

DATE

 

 

IN

TOWN

COUNTY

FOR REHAB

 

OUT

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  * R = released; D = died; DOA = Dead on arrival; E = euthanized on arrival; T = transferred; I = institutionalized (educational use)

 

Silicone Nipples

Silicone feeding nipples, similar in size and length to small Catac latex nipples. Can be sterilized, do not degrade and change size/shape the way latex does. #33 nipples for $10.00. We took an initial order at symposium and have ordered an additional limited supply.

Contact Beth Knapp-Tyner to check availability at WildatHeartRehab@aol.com or call her at 828-863-0505 between
1 pm-9 pm daily.




The importance of data

The data you send us helps WRNC to assist YOU, the rehabilitator. Uses include:
· Acquisition of funds
· Focusing education efforts
· Connecting rehabilitators with common interests with each other
· Evaluation of statewide trends
Data is confidential and not used to check-up on rehabilitators or report at the state or federal level. Send in your existing records or use the format provided on the prior pages.


Congratulations

Hearty congratulations to our editor, Sally Davis, who was recently accepted to the AQUVET II summer program in Woods Hole, MA to continue her study of fish pathology, as well as, being awarded the Association for Women Veterinarians Student Scholarship. AND if those achievements weren't HOT enough, she was also selected to receive a research grant, the "Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation Frontiers of Veterinary Medicine Fellowship", for a clinical pathology based health assessment of Sea Hares (marine snails), which will keep her on the move this summer (and not at a snail's pace!).

Much kudos to Sally from the WRNC board members!

- Linda Bergman

Trivia answers

1. Hummingbird
2. Muskrat
3. Frog
4. Great Horned Owl
5. Velvet
6. Humpback whales
7. Woodchuck (groundhog)
8. Cardinal
9. Turtle
10. Peregrine falcon

Less than 5 right: trivia's not your strength
5 - 6: fair
7 - 8: you're pretty good
9 -10: you should have entered the contest



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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